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Welcome to the Roost

Hudsonian Godwits Photo: Yousif Attia

Spend time with birds and connect with our bird experts

Latest Features

Your Guide to Helping Canada’s Birds

We are excited to share this handy reference to help us all take action for birds.​ These recommendations are backed by science and endorsed by Birds Canada. Whether you are new to birding or have been a bird conservation advocate for decades please use this information and let others know what they can be doing to help birds.

Revealing the life of our upstairs neighbours: Chimney Swifts

Birds Canada launches a new educational video featuring the Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica), a unique and declining bird species at risk. Chimney Swifts are somewhat mysterious since their nests are not typically visible, located inside chimneys or hidden within other human-built structures.

Podcasts

The Warblers

A new podcast by Birds Canada – The Warblers! Your hosts Andrea Gress and Andrés Jiménez chat with interesting guests sharing information and inspiration about birds and bird conservation in Canada. Listen, subscribe or follow on Spotify, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you find your favourite podcasts.

Link to Songbirding Podcast.

SONGBIRDING PODCAST

Immerse yourself in birdsong in this relaxed pace acoustic exploration of natural spaces by creator and host, Rob Porter. Season 4 podcasts are available on Spotify and Apple Podcasts.

Link to ABA American Birding Podcast.

American Birding

The annual Winter Finch Forecast is easily one of the highlights of the birding year for many, and a perfect combination of birding science and birding art. Nate Swick speaks to Tyler Hoar about taking the forecast into the 21st Century.

Link to ABA American Birding Podcast.

Bird Note

Two-minute daily shows that bring joy, inspiration, and hope to those who value birds and the environment we share. Check out “Experience Wildness with Adrian Dorst” and “David Sibley – Sketching and Painting Impressions” to get started.

Articles

A snowy owl on a post.

SHARE YOUR CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT STORY WITH US!

Some traditions change with time, but one thing that has remained consistent is that the CBC is just as much about people as it is about birds. We want to celebrate the dedicated people who are part of the CBC tradition. That’s why we’re inviting each of you to share your CBC story!

A snowy owl on a post.

OWL OBSERVATION TIPS FOR BIRDERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS

For many bird lovers, seeing our first owl in the wild is a cherished memory. We benefit from these experiences, but, if we’re not mindful, the impact on the owls can be negative one.

A snowy owl on a post.

EBIRDING ON CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNTS

Visit eBird Canada for an article featuring tips and best practices for using eBird on your CBC. One way is to use the newly released Trip Reports feature.

A snowy owl on a post.

BIRD-FRIENDLY HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE​

With the holiday season coming up quickly, our team at Birds Canada wanted to share these gift ideas with you. Find something special for your loved ones AND make a meaningful impact for birds!

Birds in Focus

Watch and learn more about birds and some of the work we do at Birds Canada.

A snowy owl on a post.

Story Map: Exploring the Salish Sea

The Salish Sea is far more than the body of water that bears its name. The Salish Sea ecosystem is a complex and interconnected biome that contains both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Explore the Story Map to learn more.
 

Book Launch: 100 Flying Birds

Flying is one of the most inspirational aspects of birds, yet, it’s often taken for granted, join Birds Canada and world-renown wildlife photographer, Peter Cavanagh, to learn and understand how birds fly.

Sample Our Online Birding Courses

Join Birds Canada staff for these high-quality, free online courses that will bring you engaging, useful, geographically-relevant, and up-to-date information to help you connect with and conserve birds.

 

Activities for Families

Yellow-rumped Warbler perched on branch. Link to BIRD IDENTIFICATION TOOL

BIRD IDENTIFICATION TOOL

Did you see a bird in your yard that you haven’t seen before? Create a downloadable and printable field guide customized for your location and time of year to help nail down an identification.

Link to Junior Birder Guide. The cover of the Junior Birder Guide features a sketch of several birds, including a beautiful male Ruby-throated Hummingbird

JUNIOR BIRDER GUIDE

Download and print your own Junior Birder Journal and Activity Guide! Learn about birds, how to identify them, and what you can do to protect birds in your neighborhood.

Link to fun, do-it-yourself crafts. The photo features a bird feeder made of popsicle sticks!

FOR THE BIRDS

Fun crafts you can make at home like do-it-yourself bird feeders, suet treats, and bird cookies to help out birds.

Link to fun, do-it-yourself crafts. The photo features a bird feeder made of popsicle sticks!

FIND THE BIRDS

Developed by Canadian birder, Adam Dhalla, this mobile phone game is a bridge from screen time to green time.

Videos

Project FeederWatch

Volunteers across North America contribute to bird research by watching their feeder birds from November to April with Project FeederWatch. It’s a fun winter activity you can enjoy from home – it’s easy, and it helps birds!

Watch a video on the Christmas Bird Count in Canada.

Land and Sea: The Christmas Bird Count

Take an in-depth look at what it’s like to be involved in the Christmas Bird Count and why this annual tradition is so important for birds.

GARDENING FOR BIRDS

View our new Gardening for Birds video series, which will give you some bite-sized practical tips on ways you can start gardening for birds.

Virtual birding

Enjoy birds from home with live videos from feeder cams.

Your Bird Moment

The Wood Thrush is revered for its ethereal song throughout its eastern North American range. In Canada, it is found in southern Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Québec, Ontario, and occasionally Manitoba. + “Your Bird Moment”

Photo: Yousif Attia
Tennessee Warbler

Your Bird Moment

The Tennessee Warbler is a renowned spruce budworm specialist, with breeding populations at certain sites known to increase as much as tenfold in five years in response to budworm outbreaks. + “Your Bird Moment”

A male Thick-billed Longspur on a rock.

Your Bird Moment

Male Thick-billed Longspurs have black breasts and chestnut patches on their wings. They are bigger and chunkier
than sparrows and their beaks are black (sparrows typically have pale beaks ). + “Your Bird Moment”

Northern Flicker

Your Bird Moment

This species is known for the “dance” it performs during courtship and territorial disputes. Two birds of the same sex face off and bop their heads, often while an individual of the opposite sex watches. + “Your Bird Moment”

(Photo: Nick Saunders)

Your Bird Moment

Common Redpolls are small, acrobatic, and lively finches found in the northern boreal region during the summer. + “Your Bird Moment”

(Photo: Nick Saunders)

Your Bird Moment

Not just a king by name, the kingbird also has a small red patch on its crown, although this feature is usually hidden and seldom seen. + “Your Bird Moment”

Your Bird Moment

The Evening Grosbeak might be one of the most misunderstood birds in North America. Even its name – meant to suggest that it sings only in the evening – is based on a misconception. + “Your Bird Moment”

(Photo: May Haga)
Least Flycatcher, Saskatchewan

Your Bird Moment

The Least Flycatcher’s fiery attitude is well-concealed beneath a bland exterior. Birders sigh in frustration over the drab plumage that makes it nearly indistinguishable from other closely-related species. + “Your Bird Moment”

YOUR BIRD MOMENT

The Yellow Warbler’s song is easy to remember. It sounds like it’s saying “sweet, sweet, sweet, I’m so sweet” – which is very fitting! + “YOUR BIRD MOMENT”

(Photo: May Haga)

Your Bird Moment

The Long-eared Owl is one of Canada’s most widespread species. It is found in almost every province, and throughout the northern hemisphere, including Eurasia and northern Africa. + “Your Bird Moment”

Photo: Stu Mackenzie

Your Bird Moment

Despite its name, the Philadelphia Vireo is seldom seen in Philadelphia. The oldest recorded Philadelphia Vireo was at least 8 years and 10 months old when found in Guatemala in 1970. It had been banded in Ontario in 1962. + “Your Bird Moment”

Your Bird Moment

The Bonaparte’s Gull is the only gull to build a stick nest in a tree, usually a conifer. It also tends not to gorge on garbage or carrion, feeding on insects, fish, crustaceans, and molluscs instead. + “Your Bird Moment”

(Photo: Nick Saunders)

Your Bird Moment

The Long-eared Owl is one of Canada’s most widespread species. It is found in almost every province, and throughout the northern hemisphere, including Eurasia and northern Africa. + “Your Bird Moment”

Photo: Stu Mackenzie

Your Bird Moment

This stocky Buteo is easiest to spot during migration, when it forms spectacular “kettles” – swirling masses of soaring birds. + “Your Bird Moment”

(Photo: Nick Saunders)
Canada Jay Nick Saunders

Your Bird Moment

Canada Jays survive without fresh food for long periods by storing food at all times of year in thousands of widely-scattered caches throughout their territories. + “Your Bird Moment”

(Photo: Nick Saunders)
Horned Grebe

Your Bird Moment

Grebes have lobed (rather than webbed) feet – a feature that sets them apart from ducks and geese. Grebes’ feet are also set toward the back of their body, which is an adaptation for steering while diving.  + “Your Bird Moment”

Photo: Ron Ridout
Golden Eagle

Your Bird Moment

As one of the largest, fastest, and most nimble eagles in North America, this raptor is able to target much larger prey than others. + “Your Bird Moment”

Photo: Ron Ridout

Interested in learning more about Canada's birds? Need some inspiration? Or have some to share? Spend some time with birds and our bird experts virtually here. New content will be uploaded regularly. Please share your birding stories or bird activities with us at jallair AT birdscanada.org, or on social media and we’ll help share the inspiration!

Red-eyed Vireo (a persistent singer found in mixed wood forests across Canada) Photo: Sherri & Brock Fenton

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